Honoring History on the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

By Kia Hill

Being a Greening Youth Foundation Cultural Resource Intern on the Selma to Montgomery  National Historic Trail has made me realize how imperative this trail is to our history. There are no words that can help me express how I feel about the courageous and brave people who sacrificed their lives justifying their right to vote. I have met many leaders and foot soldiers while being on this trail and I am speechless to be in the presence of them. It’s empowering to hear them talk about their experience.

 L to R,  Jasmyn Bowie, Congressman John Lewis and Kia Hill on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

L to R,  Jasmyn Bowie, Congressman John Lewis and Kia Hill on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

One of my most memorable experiences on the trail was when I met Congressman John Lewis last year during Jubilee. He is a phenomenal and bold human being who, along with Hosea Williams, led the Bloody Sunday March on March 7, 1965. John Lewis is the definition of a kind-hearted man with pure intentions, who stands for integrity and peace. I got a chance to introduce myself, hug him, and thank him for playing a pivotal role in the movement. He is a hero to me. It is an honor working on this trail because my life has been impacted by people from all over the world who come to the Selma Interpretive Center to learn about the Voting Rights Movement and to pay their respects to the people that created history.

Kia Hill is a Cultural Resource Intern on the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail in Selma, Alabama at the Selma Interpretive Center.